How to Conduct a Wine Tasting
Print a Score Card

Wine Tasting - Wine Tasting Party, Wine Tasting score card
Dave Bucholz
filling the glasses



Wine Tasting - Wine Tasting Party, Wine Tasting score card
Debby Wood
ready to taste

Wine Tasting
Chuck Bucholz
tasting the wine

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What to serve at a wine tasting, how many glasses, how to do a blind and double blind tasting

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Score Card
source: text info and photographs created by Peggy Bucholz for www.finedinings.com

1. Choose varietal wine.
There are many types of grape wine to choose.

Do you want to taste red or white?

Some of the most popular types to taste are:
RED: Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Pinot Noir, Petite Syrah, Zinfandel

WHITE: Chardonnay, Chenin Blanc, Gewurztraminer, Sauvignon Blanc, Riesling, Semillon,
Pinot Gris.


2. Choose the region of wine.
Do you prefer vin from California, Washington, Oregon; Australia; France; Italy; Portugal; Germany, etc.


3. Set a dollar amount.
All the vin should be within the same price range. It would not be fair for someone to bring a $25 bottle of wine and another brings a $3 bottle, setting a dollar value solves this problem.


4. Extend invitations.
You may want to first consult your guests for their opinion of the type to taste.


5. How much wine to bring?
Each person should bring a 375 ml bottle (1/2 of a 750 ml regular bottle). Tasting four of them seems to be a good number, you may want to do more or less.


6. What to serve with wine?
Small cubes of French bread and small cubes of mild cheddar cheese are needed for palate cleansers as well as water for each taster. If you are not interested in serious tastings, hors d'oeuvres of your choice can be served.


7. You will need score cards...... how many?
You will need a score card for each wine, per person. (example: if you are tasting four and there are four people participating, you will need 16 cards.
Click here to copy Score Cards


8. How many glasses per person?
Each taster will need one glass for each wines, e.g. if you are tasting 4 different Merlot's, each person will need 4 glasses.


9. What type of glasses to use?
Chose large bowl type glasses with a small opening at the top so that you can swirl the vin to determine the aroma. Experienced tasters will always hold glasses by the stem never by the bowl, this heats the contents. Depending on how one holds their glasses is usually a telltale sign to others. Since white vin is usually chilled, some times it is too cold to determine the aroma. If this is the case, then it is appropriate to hold the glass by the bowl with both hands to take the chill off in order to determine the aroma. Once it has heated up sufficiently, hold the glass by the stem and resume tasting.


10. What type of table cover to use?
Always use a plain white tablecloth, tasters can see the color of the wine more clearly.


How To Conduct A Wine Tasting

1. Everyone knows the names of all the wines being tasted.

2. Usually a tasting will consist of four different wines. Each taster has four score cards, one for each of the wines and numbers their cards one through four.

3. Each taster pours a small amount of each vin into one of their glasses and writes down on their cards the name of the wine in glass #1, glass #2, etc. do not mix the order of the glasses.

4. Small cubes of French bread and mild cheddar cheese cubes should be available as palate cleansers as well as a glass of water for each taster.

5. After the tasting is complete, everyone shares their findings.

How to Do A Blind Wine Tasting

1.Everyone is told the names of all the wines being tasted.

2. Each bottle is put into a paper bag and numbered 1 through 4 or whatever amount of different wines you are tasting.

3.Two people go out of the room out of sight and hearing while 2 people remain, one to pour the vin and the other person to write down on paper the number of the paper bag of wine being poured into the two tasters four glasses who are out of the room. When this is done then the other two tasters go out of the room while their vin is being poured and recorded. Make sure the correct information is being written down.

4. Small cubes of French bread and mild cheddar cheese cubes should be available as palate cleansers as well as a glass of water for each taster.

5. Each person numbers their score cards #1, #2, etc. and tastes each wine according to instructions on the cards, do not mix the order of the glasses.

6. At the end of the tasting, each person shares their findings and tries to guess which wine was #1, etc.


How To Do A Double Blind Wine Tasting

1. No one should know the name of the wine each one brings.

2. Each bottle is completely hidden within a paper bag, it is a good idea to rubber band the top paper bag portion to the bottle, some tasters are extremely knowledgeable and will recognize the necks of some bottles; no one should know which wines are in the paper bags.

3. the bags are numbered one through four (if 4 wines are being tasted).

4. Each taster has four glasses, one for each of the wines presented.

5. Each person pours a small amount from bag #1 into their first glass, bag #2 into their second glass, and so on until each person has a small portion of wines in all four of their glasses do not mix the order of the glasses.

6. Each taster has four score cards, one for each of the wines and numbers their cards one through four.

7.Wines are rated according to sight, scent, taste and overall quality, giving each category a number value according to the information on the score cards.

8. Small cubes of French bread and mild cheddar cheese should be available as palate cleansers as well as a glass of water for each taster.

9. After analyzing each one, tasters share their findings and try to guess what was in glass #1, etc.

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